Just a diabetic girl living in a lonely world...
©
  • Boy: So, what's your type?
  • Girl: Type 1.
shared 4 hours ago via diabeticposts · © littlexsweetxthing with 208 NOTES

People are so quick to say “it could be worse” and so incredibly slow to try and understand the amount of pain, sickness, and worry I feel on a daily basis.

shared 1 day ago with 17 NOTES
People always tell me I could have it worse. But they don’t feel the pain of diabetes. Every needle, every finger poke, every silent tear that falls when no one else is around. Yeah, maybe I could have it worse but you sure have it a lot better then me.
shared 1 day ago via mypurplepancreas · © mydiabetessecret with 102 NOTES

Forever with Diabetes 

t1dom:

diabeticpikachu:

redlipshugehips:

titaniumjaymee:

redlipshugehips:

insulinismylife:

In adolescent psych, I learned that teenagers believe in the invincibility fable.

That part of being young is not considering getting hurt.

And I wonder what that feels like.

Because I am painfully aware of how lucky I am to be alive

Every finger prick, carb counted, and injection

Just…

I can’t explain how much I relate with every single word of this. Last night I had anxiety going to sleep because of the low of 40 I had yesterday while taking a nap. All I kept thinking was “What if this time I don’t wake up?” .I constantly have this realization that this is permanent and it scares the shit out of me. 

You have no idea how freaked out I feel now. My levels have been running on the lower side lately and now I’m scared to sleep. But we kinda have to count our blessings cause there’s this little girl who lives in Lancaster PA and she has type 1 diabetes, only difference is that she can’t feel when she’s low. So she could collapse at any second and not feel it coming.

That’s horrible :( I usually can’t feel my lows when they’re in the high 60s and any lower than that I just feel slightly dizzy/ light headed but I’ve never gotten below 60 so I’m thankful I was able to wake up I feel like someone was watching over me

Wow I feel lucky then. When I’m asleep if my blood sugars hit 50 my body automatically wakes me up to do something about it :/

I’ve had 2 times now where I normally fall asleep but am awoken by paramedics and my parents crying because my body has went cold. I do not sleep well just fear itself can weigh on you more then diabetes does. Talking about it brings back those shivers…

shared 1 day ago via mypurplepancreas · © insulinismylife with 96 NOTES
  •  *Sips milkshake but doesn't swallow it*
  •  What are you doing?! You have diabetes!
  •  Ith a mebaforh
shared 1 day ago via mypurplepancreas · © andbeholdapalehorse with 105 NOTES

When my blood sugar is high and I’m dying of thirst even though I’m chugging water 

whatdiabetesshouldcallme:

image

shared 1 day ago via whatdiabetesshouldcallme with 68 NOTES

wolffromupnorth:

Is this a panic attack or is my blood sugar just low

Is my blood sugar low or am I just too hot

Is my blood sugar low or am I just hungry

The adventures of a diabetic

shared 1 day ago via tumblrbetics · © wolffromupnorth with 136 NOTES
dendroica:

Even Small Medical Advances Can Mean Big Jumps in Bills

Traditionally, insurers lost money by covering people with chronic illnesses, because they often ended up hospitalized with myriad complications as their diseases progressed. Today, the routine care costs of many chronic illnesses eclipse that of acute care because new treatments that keep patients well have become a multibillion-dollar business opportunity for device and drug makers and medical providers.
The high price of new treatments for diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, colitis and other chronic diseases contribute mightily to the United States’ $2.7 trillion annual health care bill.
More than 1.5 million Americans have Type 1 diabetes and cannot survive without frequent insulin doses, so they are utterly dependent on a small number of producers of supplies and drugs, which have great leeway to set prices. (Patients with the far more common Type 2 diabetes — linked to obesity — still produce insulin and can improve with lifestyle changes and weight loss, or on oral medicines.)
That captive audience of Type 1 diabetics has spawned lines of high-priced gadgets and disposable accouterments, borrowing business models from technology companies like Apple: Each pump and monitor requires the separate purchase of an array of items that are often brand and model specific.
A steady stream of new models and updates often offer dubious improvement: colored pumps; talking, bilingual meters; sensors reporting minute-by-minute sugar readouts. Ms. Hayley’s new pump will cost $7,350 (she will pay $2,500 under the terms of her insurance). But she will also need to pay her part for supplies, including $100 monitor probes that must be replaced every week, disposable tubing that she must change every three days and 10 or so test strips every day.
That does not even include insulin, which has been produced with genetic engineering and protected by patents, so that a medicine that cost a few dollars when Ms. Hayley was a child now often sells for more than $200 a vial, meaning some patients must pay more than $4,000 a year. Other refinements have benefited a minority of patients but raised prices for all. There are no generics in the United States.

(via NYTimes.com)

dendroica:

Even Small Medical Advances Can Mean Big Jumps in Bills

Traditionally, insurers lost money by covering people with chronic illnesses, because they often ended up hospitalized with myriad complications as their diseases progressed. Today, the routine care costs of many chronic illnesses eclipse that of acute care because new treatments that keep patients well have become a multibillion-dollar business opportunity for device and drug makers and medical providers.

The high price of new treatments for diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, colitis and other chronic diseases contribute mightily to the United States’ $2.7 trillion annual health care bill.

More than 1.5 million Americans have Type 1 diabetes and cannot survive without frequent insulin doses, so they are utterly dependent on a small number of producers of supplies and drugs, which have great leeway to set prices. (Patients with the far more common Type 2 diabetes — linked to obesity — still produce insulin and can improve with lifestyle changes and weight loss, or on oral medicines.)

That captive audience of Type 1 diabetics has spawned lines of high-priced gadgets and disposable accouterments, borrowing business models from technology companies like Apple: Each pump and monitor requires the separate purchase of an array of items that are often brand and model specific.

A steady stream of new models and updates often offer dubious improvement: colored pumps; talking, bilingual meters; sensors reporting minute-by-minute sugar readouts. Ms. Hayley’s new pump will cost $7,350 (she will pay $2,500 under the terms of her insurance). But she will also need to pay her part for supplies, including $100 monitor probes that must be replaced every week, disposable tubing that she must change every three days and 10 or so test strips every day.

That does not even include insulin, which has been produced with genetic engineering and protected by patents, so that a medicine that cost a few dollars when Ms. Hayley was a child now often sells for more than $200 a vial, meaning some patients must pay more than $4,000 a year. Other refinements have benefited a minority of patients but raised prices for all. There are no generics in the United States.

(via NYTimes.com)

shared 1 day ago via diabeticposts · © The New York Times with 60 NOTES

When I try to do something when my blood sugar is low, I’m like: 

whatdiabetesshouldcallme:

image

shared 1 day ago via whatdiabetesshouldcallme with 196 NOTES

typicat:

"diabulimia isn’t a real eating disorder."

i will kick your ass.

shared 2 days ago via pancreatically-challenged · © typicat with 50 NOTES
missmella:

How to Still be Cool as a Diabetic:
-Flick your needles like James Dean.
-Pose when you stab yourself like Marilyn Monroe, bonus points for emitting sexual noises.
-Maintain direct eye contact with people as you inject yourself.
-Tell people that you’re injecting small doses of kryptonite.
-Tell people that you’re injecting yourself with The Antidote and sorry, they can’t have any.
-Wear cool jackets.
-Light your lancets on fire (or maybe not idk I haven’t done it, use caution).
-Jump over a flaming school bus on a motorcycle.

missmella:

How to Still be Cool as a Diabetic:

-Flick your needles like James Dean.
-Pose when you stab yourself like Marilyn Monroe, bonus points for emitting sexual noises.
-Maintain direct eye contact with people as you inject yourself.
-Tell people that you’re injecting small doses of kryptonite.
-Tell people that you’re injecting yourself with The Antidote and sorry, they can’t have any.
-Wear cool jackets.
-Light your lancets on fire (or maybe not idk I haven’t done it, use caution).
-Jump over a flaming school bus on a motorcycle.
shared 3 days ago via pancreatically-challenged · © missmella with 426 NOTES

Reblog this if you have Diabetes. 

timetravelingdwarf:

So I have Diabetes and I was just wondering how many other Diabetics are there on tumblr. So Reblog if you have Diabetes. 

shared 3 days ago via mypurplepancreas · © timetravelingdwarf with 534 NOTES
I took out my site and it’s really sore and gross looking,

I took out my site and it’s really sore and gross looking,

shared 4 days ago

anothergirlwithauke:

you think glasses get awkward during sex?

try having an insulin pump attached to you

motiveweight:

You just don’t give up. It’s lame. You’re not a quitter. That’s not who you are.

motiveweight:

You just don’t give up. It’s lame. You’re not a quitter. That’s not who you are.

shared 5 days ago via mypurplepancreas · © allewissenesbesser with 5779 NOTES